Archive for the ‘Webb, Philip’ Category

Philip Webb and Standen

April 28, 2015
A view over the garden towards the south front of Standen, designed by Philip Webb. ©National Trust Images/John Miller

A view over the garden towards the south front of Standen, designed by Philip Webb. ©National Trust Images/John Miller

As part of the Philip Webb centenary, the colleagues looking after Standen have made available a few historic images of this Webb-designed country house.

The Beale family in the porch at Standen 1902. ©National Trust

The Beale family in the porch at Standen 1902. ©National Trust

Standen, completed in 1894, is a rare example of a virtually unaltered Webb design.

Standen seen from the upper lawn, in about  1900, with the garden still in its infancy. ©National Trust

Standen seen from the upper lawn, in about 1900, with the garden still in its infancy. ©National Trust

Webb also designed many of the fixtures and fittings, which were then combined with lighting by W.A.S. Benson, wallpapers and fabrics by Morris & Co and furniture, and furnishings and works of art by other Arts & Crafts designers such as William de Morgan, Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

The hall at Standen, used by the Beale family for tea and musical evenings. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The hall at Standen, used by the Beale family for tea and musical evenings. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The house was built for James Beale (1840-1912), a wealthy solicitor (visible standing on the far left in the family photograph above). The Beales were a Unitarian family who had been active in the business and civic life of Birmingham.

Margaret ('Maggie') Beale (1872-1947), chanelling the Arts & Crafts lifestyle in the drawing room at Standen. ©National Trust

Margaret (‘Maggie’) Beale (1872-1947), chanelling the Arts & Crafts lifestyle in the drawing room at Standen. ©National Trust

James Beale’s work in facilitating the growth of the Midland Railway brought him to London, but in 1890 he also bought land in West Sussex with a view to building a country house for his family.

The main courtyard at Standen as the house was being finished in about 1893, showing the workmen's hut at left. ©National Trust

The main courtyard at Standen as the house was being finished in about 1893, showing the workmen’s hut at left. ©National Trust

Webb was known for his beautiful and well-designed but sober buildings, and he had a reputation for staying withing budget – all factors that must have appealed to the cultivated, high-minded Beales.

The dining room at Standen. The fitted dresser was designed by Webb, and he is known to have inspired his clients to display blue and white porcelain, as was done here. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The dining room at Standen. The fitted dresser was designed by Webb, and he is known to have inspired his clients to display blue and white porcelain, as was done here. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

James Beale’s wife, Margaret (1847-1936) was an expert needlewoman, and her taste is reflected in the many Arts & Crafts textiles in the house.

The 'Larkspur' bedroom at Standen. The fitted wardrobes were designed by Webb for the family's eldest daughter, Amy Beale. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The ‘Larkspur’ bedroom at Standen. The fitted wardrobes were designed by Webb for the family’s eldest daughter, Amy Beale. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Webb remained on friendly terms with the Beale family. In 1902 he retired to a cottage in Worth, ten miles west of Standen.

The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) is also celebrating Webb’s centenary, with a dedicated blog.

 

 

 

 

Wightwick welcomes the animals

November 15, 2013
Watercolour drawing of a lion by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

Watercolour drawing of a lion by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

A little while ago I mentioned that we were raising funds to purchase four drawings of animals by the Arts and Crafts designer Philip Webb (1831-1915) for Wightwick Manor. I am delighted to be able to relay that we have now acquired them.

Watercolour drawing of a hare by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

Watercolour drawing of a hare by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

The required sum of £190,000 was raised through donations from the public as well as substantial grants from the Art Fund, the Monument Trust and the V&A Purchase Grants Fund.

Watercolour drawing of a raven by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

Watercolour drawing of a raven by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

The watercolours were originally owned by Laurence W. Hodson (1864-1933), a Wolverhampton industrialist and philanthropist who lived at Compton Hall, which was furnished with Morris & Co. textiles and wallpapers.

Watercolour drawing of a fox by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

Watercolour drawing of a fox by Philip Webb, c. 1887. ©Paul Highnam

Wightwick Manor, about a mile from Compton Hall, was built in 1887 for Theodore Mander (1853-190), a fellow industrialist, and was similarly furnished in Arts & Crafts style. The Webb animal drawings will henceforth be on display as part of the rich interiors and collections at Wightwick, reinforcing the historic link between Wolverhampton and the Arts & Crafts movement.