Archive for the ‘Clandon Park’ Category

The plan for Clandon

January 19, 2016
The Marble Hall, 1, photo James Dobson-National Trust Images

The Marble Hall at Clandon, following the removal of the debris and the stabilisation of the remaining wall surfaces. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

An announcement was made yesterday about the plans to bring Clandon Park back to life following the devastating fire last April.

Crates with salavaged items from the Saloon, photo James Dobson-National Trust Images

Crates with salvaged fragments in the Saloon. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

Over the last nine months, the colleagues involved with Clandon have reviewed a number of options, ranging from leaving it as a ruin to a full restoration. They considered the architectural significance of what had survived the fire, the items salvaged from the building and what was technically possible within it.

Cleaning the leg of a marble topped table in the Marble Hall, photo James Dobson-National Trust Images

Conservator cleaning the remains of a side table in the Marble Hall. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

The criteria guiding the decision-making process reflect the National Trust’s core purpose. They include making sure that Clandon remains open to the public, considering Clandon’s historic and cultural significance and generating enough income to maintain its long-term conservation.

We are now confident that a number of principal rooms on the ground floor, including the Marble Hall, the Speakers’ Parlour and the Saloon, can be restored – and should be, given their architectural and historical significance.

Statue of Venus in the Marble Hall, photo James Dobson-National Trust Images

A plaster cast of a statue of Venus, still in situ in the Marble Hall. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

The fact that so many features survived the fire, and that items from the rooms have been recovered from the ashes, makes the case for restoration compelling. We will be able to draw on a wealth of relevant expertise from within the National Trust and from elsewhere.

But we are not looking to recreate the rooms as they were the day before the fire. The enduring significance of architect Giacomo Leoni’s original designs means that we can go back to the original eighteenth-century decorative schemes and layout of the house.

The Marble Hall, 2, photo James Dobson-National Trust Images

View of the Marble Hall, with a protective temporary roof visible above. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

The rooms on the upper floors were less architecturally significant and had been considerably altered over the centuries. So it has been proposed to transform those rooms into flexible spaces which could be used for exhibitions, events and performances.

Recent research has also given us a better understanding of the original eighteenth-century gardens. If resources permit we hope to bring those back to life as well, in the spirit of a project that will both look back to the best of the past and create an exciting future for Clandon.

More information, images and updates can be found on our website.

Hope for Clandon

June 25, 2015
The interior of Clandon the day after the fire. ©National Trust Images/John Millar

The interior of Clandon the day after the fire. ©National Trust Images/John Millar

On April 29 Clandon Park suffered a devastating fire which destroyed most of its interior. Thousands of items are feared to have been lost. Following the initial firefighting and salvage operations, structural engineers and insurers have been assessing the site.

A bust from the Marble Hall which was salvaged immediately after the fire. ©National Trust Images/John Millar

A bust from the Marble Hall which was salvaged immediately after the fire. ©National Trust Images/John Millar

Helen Ghosh, our Director General, has now said that ‘We’re hopeful that one day we can rebuild Clandon, but quite how, when and in what form is far from certain at this early stage. Nevertheless we would like to reassure all those people who love Clandon as much as we do that it will continue in some shape or form in the future.’

Firemen recovering the frame of the portrait of the 1st Lord Onslow from the Speakers' Parlour. The portrait itself had been cut from the frame during the initial salvage operation. ©National Trust/John Millar

Firemen recovering the frame of the portrait of the 1st Lord Onslow from the Speakers’ Parlour. The portrait itself had been cut from the frame during the initial salvage operation. ©National Trust/John Millar

The external walls remain largely intact and work will begin shortly to erect scaffolding. Once that is complete and the building has been declared safe, specialist teams will undertake an archaeological salvage operation to recover more of what remains.

State purse of Arthur Onslow, the 'Great Speaker' (1691-1768). ©National Trust

State purse of Arthur Onslow, the ‘Great Speaker’ (1691-1768). ©National Trust

3D laser scanning, geophysical surveys and both ground-level and aerial photography are all being used to assess the site.

Carved and gilded armchair associated with the 'Great Speaker'. ©National Trust

Carved and gilded armchair associated with the ‘Great Speaker’. ©National Trust

Significant objects from the collection were rescued from the fire, including paintings, furniture and silver. However, it will not be possible to confirm the full list of items saved and lost until the the full salvage operation has been completed.

The 4th Countess of Onslow's dinner book, recording menus and guests for dinners given at Clandon between 1875 and 1910. ©National Trust

The 4th Countess of Onslow’s dinner book, recording menus and guests for dinners given at Clandon between 1875 and 1910. ©National Trust

But curator Sophie Chessum, who is leading the conservation team, has said she is pleased that a number of significant objects with connections to the Onslow family, who built Clandon, have been saved.

Prisoner of war badge belonging to the 6th Earl of Onslow, who was imprisoned at Offlag 79 camp near Brunswick during the last months of the Second World War. ©National Trust

Prisoner of war badge belonging to the 6th Earl of Onslow, who was imprisoned at Offlag 79 camp near Brunswick during the last months of the Second World War. ©National Trust

Some of the latest items confirmed as saved include the purse of state of ‘Great Speaker’ Arthur Onslow, an armchair associated with the Great Speaker, the 4th Countess of Onslow’s dinner book and the prisoner of war badge of the 6th Earl of Onslow.

Clandon Park: the Speakers’ Parlour

May 6, 2015
The Speakers' Parlour at Clandon Park following the fire, showing the carpet being removed. Also visible is a large frame from which a portrait painting was cut, in anticipation of the fire reaching this room, which fortunately didn't happen. ©National Trust

The Speakers’ Parlour at Clandon Park following the fire, showing the carpet being removed. Also visible is a large frame from which a portrait painting was cut, in anticipation of the fire reaching this room, which fortunately didn’t happen. ©National Trust

It has just been confirmed that the Speakers’ Parlour at Clandon was not damaged as severely in the recent fire as many of the other areas of the house.

The ceiling of the Speakers' Parlour propped up, and the chandelier removed. ©National Trust

The ceiling of the Speakers’ Parlour propped up, and the chandelier removed. ©National Trust

This family dining room was named after the portraits hanging there of the three members of the Onslow family who were Speakers of the House of Commons: Richard Onslow (1528-71, ‘the Black Speaker’), Sir Richard Onslow, 3rd Bt and 1st Baron Onslow (1654-1717), and Arthur Onslow (1691-1768, ‘the Great Speaker’).

View of the west front, showing the remains of the ground floor Saloon. The Giacomo Leoni-designed chimneypiece, with its overmantel relief of Mars and Venus, is visible through the second window from the left. ©National Trust

View of the west front, showing the remains of the ground floor Saloon. The Giacomo Leoni-designed chimneypiece, with its overmantel relief of Mars and Venus, is visible through the second window from the left. ©National Trust

The important plaster ceiling in this room remains in place and has now been propped up. The chimneypiece, designed by the house’s architect, Giacomo Leoni, also survives.

One of a pair of giltwood side tables in the manner of John Gumley and James Moore, made in about 1725, both salvaged from the State Bedroom. Inv. nos. 1440548.1&2. ©National Trust

One of a pair of giltwood side tables in the manner of John Gumley and James Moore, made in about 1725, both salvaged from the State Bedroom. Inv. nos. 1440548.1&2. ©National Trust

The Regency ormolu chandelier, the Regency steel grate and the Turkey carpet in this room have been taken into protective storage, as have all the paintings that hung here, including the portraits of the three Speakers.

Rooftop view of Clandon following the fire. ©National Trust

Rooftop view of Clandon following the fire. ©National Trust

Jim Foy, the general manager for Hughenden Manor who is currently leading the salvage operation at Clandon, comments: ‘We are still limited in terms of access while structural engineers assess the building. The weather is also a big factor, as we wait to see how the building responds to the high winds we have had over the last couple of days.’

List of rules to be observed in the Servants' Hall at Clandon, eighteenth century, confirmed salvaged from the fire. Inv. no. 1441224. ©National Trust

List of rules to be observed in the Servants’ Hall at Clandon, eighteenth century, confirmed salvaged from the fire. Inv. no. 1441224. ©National Trust

Jim adds: ‘We are incredibly grateful for the continued support we are receiving from volunteers, external specialists, the fire service and many others.’

Clandon Park: the salvage has begun

May 1, 2015
One of the central doorways of the burned-out Marble Hall at Clandon Park, with a bust of an African still in place. ©National Trust/John Millar

One of the central doorways of the burned-out Marble Hall at Clandon Park, with a bust of an African still in place. ©National Trust/John Millar

The devastating fire at Clandon Park the day before yesterday has left the house a burned-out shell. The fire started in the basement of the house and swept rapidly up to the roof and along and down through the building, fanned by a high wind.

Painting of an ostrich by Francis Barlow (c.1626-1704), saved from the Marble Hall at Clandon. Inv. no. 1441454. ©National Trust/John Hammond

Painting of an ostrich by Francis Barlow (c.1626-1704), saved from the Marble Hall at Clandon. Inv. no. 1441454. ©National Trust/John Hammond

This has shocked and saddened us all. But the team at Clandon, local volunteers and other colleagues have been determined to save as much as possible.

The Marble Hall at Clandon following the fire, showing a marble relief by John Michael Rysbrack still over the chimneypiece. ©National Trust/John Millar

The Marble Hall at Clandon following the fire, showing a marble relief by John Michael Rysbrack still over the chimneypiece. ©National Trust/John Millar

In accordance with the emergency procedures, the fire brigade crews were able to take out a number of objects from parts of the building not yet affected, working with the advice and support of National Trust staff.

Speaker Arthur Onslow (1691–1768) presiding over the House of Commons, by Sir James Thornhill (1675–1734) and William Hogarth (1697–1764), 1730, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inventory no. 1441463. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Speaker Arthur Onslow (1691–1768) presiding over the House of Commons, by Sir James Thornhill (1675–1734) and William Hogarth (1697–1764), 1730, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inventory no. 1441463. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The items shown here are among those saved. But until a full inventory check has been done we cannot confirm which items were not saved.

Cast of a classical statue, damaged and blackened but still in situ in the remains of the Marble Hall. ©National Trust/John Millar

Cast of a classical statue, damaged and blackened but still in situ in the remains of the Marble Hall. ©National Trust/John Millar

Teams have already been organised at Clandon and in the region to deal with the next steps.

Bible printed by John Basket in 1716 and 1717, in two volumes, presented by Arthur Onslow to St. Margaret's, Westminster in 1735, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inventory no. 1441240. ©National Trust/Nadia Mackenzie

Bible printed by John Basket in 1716 and 1717, in two volumes, presented by Arthur Onslow to St. Margaret’s, Westminster in 1735, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inventory no. 1441240. ©National Trust/Nadia Mackenzie

When our specialists are able to enter the building, the rubble will be carefully sifted for things than can be salvaged and fragments that could be used in reconstruction.

Rubble inside the remains of Clandon Park. ©National Trust/John Millar

Rubble inside the remains of Clandon Park. ©National Trust/John Millar

The remaining structure of the building will also need to be assessed.

The Clandon state bed, dating from about 1710. Its hangings had recently returned from conservation treatment and were salvaged still in their transport crates. Inv. no. 1440847. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

The Clandon state bed, dating from about 1710. Its hangings had recently returned from conservation treatment and were salvaged still in their transport crates. Inv. no. 1440847. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

Only then can decisions be taken about the future of the house.

The south front of Clandon Park following the fire. ©National Trust/John Millar

The south front of Clandon Park following the fire. ©National Trust/John Millar

But we are heartened by the many expressions of sympathy and support.

Folding screen incorporating Victorian and Edwardian Onslow family photographs, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inv. no. 1440816. ©National Trust Images/Anthony Parkinson

Folding screen incorporating Victorian and Edwardian Onslow family photographs, saved from the Library at Clandon. Inv. no. 1440816. ©National Trust Images/Anthony Parkinson

And we want to thank the crews from the Surrey Fire and Rescue Service and neighbouring fire brigades for their professionalism and team-work.