Uncloaking Dudmaston’s garden

Watercolour view of the house and park at Dudmaston, by Moses Griffith, 1793. ©National Trust Images

Watercolour view of the house and park at Dudmaston, by Moses Griffith, 1793. ©National Trust Images

The summer 2015 edition of our Arts, Buildings and Collections Bulletin has just been published. One of the contributions is an article by Sarah Kay about the garden at Dudmaston Hall in Shropshire.

The Big Pool at Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

The Big Pool at Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

As Sarah writes, the garden at Dudmaston has had a long and varied history. In the late eighteenth century it was a landscape garden, with the pastures coming right up to the house.

View of the entrance front of Dudmaston from the north-east. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

View of the entrance front of Dudmaston from the north-east. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

Then in the nineteenth century the garden was embellished with terraces, parterres, island beds, ribbon borders and exotic specimen trees. The local Morfe Cottage Garden Society, founded in 1851, organised fiercely competitive annual flower shows.

Sculpture by Anthony Robinson in the grounds of Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

Sculpture by Anthony Robinson in the grounds of Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

Following retrenchment in the Edwardian period, the garden saw a renewed phase of innovation during the second half of the twentieth century. Sir George and Lady Labouchere reinvigorated the garden with the help of designer James Russell, even introducing contemporary sculpture into the grounds.

Path along the edge of the Big Pool at Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

Path along the edge of the Big Pool at Dudmaston. ©National Trust Images/Clive Nichols

Now a project is underway to ‘uncloak’ some of the picturesque features and views which have been lost over the years, while simultaneously keeping alive the spirit of innovation shown by successive owners of Dudmaston.

5 Responses to “Uncloaking Dudmaston’s garden”

  1. Michael Shepherd Says:

    I always remember the computing exhibition detailing the history of the father of computing Charles Babbage and, in the garden, The Dingle from my visits to Dudmaston: a very tranquil place. The full and fascinating report on the Dudmaston Landscape can be found @ http://philipkay.co.uk/Dudmaston-Park-History-of-the-Landscape-Final-Report-May-2012.pdf

  2. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Thanks very much for that link, Michael.

  3. CherryPie Says:

    I always enjoy a walk around the Dudmaston estate and I look forward to seeing the features as they are unfolded.

  4. camilledefleurville Says:

    I don’t know all the treasures you are showing us regularly, being French. But thank you so much. And thank you particularly for this blog. Beautiful photographs and such a peace.

  5. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Cherie and Camille, I am glad you both like this post, and this garden.

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