A classical landscape for Belton

March 25, 2015
Attributed to Nicolaes Berchem (1620-83), Classical Landscape with Figures and Animals. ©Tennants

Attributed to Nicolaes Berchem (1620-83), Classical Landscape with Figures and Animals. ©Tennants

We have just managed to purchase this painting at auction at Tennants, attributed to the Dutch Italianate landscape painter Nicolaes Pieterszoon Berchem (1620-83). It was at Belton House during the nineteenth and the early twentieth century, and it will now return there.

A nice story about Berchem’s name is that this was a descriptive nickname given to him by the pupils in the studio of the painter Jan van Goyen, who regularly used to hide him (‘Berg hem!’ meaning ‘Hide him!’) when he was in disgrace and was being pursued by his father. A more prosaic explanation is that it relates to his father’s hometown, Berchem, near Antwerp.

Berchem travelled to Westphalia with Jacob van Ruysdael in about 1650, and he subsequently may have traveled to Italy as well. Certainly his style reflects the contemporary fashion for Italian light and scenery.

Martin Archer Shee (1769-1850), portrait of John Cust, 1st Earl Brownlow (1779-1853). ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Martin Archer Shee (1769-1850), portrait of John Cust, 1st Earl Brownlow (1779-1853). ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The painting was recorded at Belton House in 1809, in the ownership of John Cust, 2nd Baron and later 1st Earl Brownlow (1778-1853), who had himself traveled to Italy in 1802. The 1st Earl’s brother’s grandson, Adalbert Cust, 5th Baron Brownlow (1867-1927) left it to his sister, the Hon. Marion Isabella Tower (née Cust, 1854-1939). In 1958 it was with the London dealer Alfred Brod.

Churchill paintings accepted for the nation

March 10, 2015
Looking south-east from the balcony at Chartwell towards the painting studio, with the Kentish Weald beyond, a view Churchill loved. ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

Looking south-east from the balcony at Chartwell towards the painting studio, with the Kentish Weald beyond, a view Churchill loved. ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

It has just been announced that the Government has accepted a major collection of paintings by Sir Winston Churchill in lieu of inheritance tax. Most of the paintings have been allocated to the National Trust and will remain at Chartwell, where they had been on long-term loan.

The south front of Chartwell. ©National Trust Images/Robert Morris

The south front of Chartwell. ©National Trust Images/Robert Morris

The paintings were part of the estate of Lady Soames, Churchill’s last surviving child, who died last year. The inheritance tax liability was less than the tax settlement value of the paintings, but the executors of Lady Soames’s estate generously agreed to forgo the difference. In addition one further painting by Churchill was donated directly to the National Trust by the executors.

The garden front of Chartwell seen from the Marlborough Pavilion. ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

The garden front of Chartwell seen from the Marlborough Pavilion. ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

Apart from being a soldier, writer and politician, Churchill was also a talented amateur artist. As Lady Soames herself wrote of her father: ‘… in his 41st year [1915] painting literally “grabbed” him, thereafter playing an increasing and abiding role in his life, renewing the source of his great inner strength and enabling him to face storms, ride out depressions and rise above the tough passages in his political life.’

Churchill's study at Chartwell. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Churchill’s study at Chartwell. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

This allocation is yet another example of the hugely important role of the Acceptance in Lieu scheme in safeguarding important works of art and heritage objects for the benefit of the public. Over the last five years the scheme has brought items to the value of £150 million into public collections in the United Kingdom.

How to build a ha-ha

February 17, 2015
A section of ha-ha being rebuilt at Croome Court. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

A section of ha-ha being rebuilt at Croome Court. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

The ha-ha, a ditch with a wall built along one side, was developed as an aesthetically pleasing way of keeping grazing cattle out of the pleasure garden. Even from a short distance the ha-ha is invisible, and its name is said to have been derived from the exclamations of surprise it provoked.

The ha-ha at Croome Court before repair and rebuilding. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

The ha-ha at Croome Court before repair and rebuilding. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

The ha-ha at Croome Court has been undergoing a rolling programme of repair and rebuilding. Previously it is was  in quite poor condition and it had even collapsed in places.

Sections of the ha-ha had completely collapsed. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

Sections of the ha-ha had completely collapsed. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

Advice was sought from a structural engineer in order to provide a more durable solution for the collapsed sections. A backing wall of concrete blocks was inserted first, which was then covered by historically appropriate bricks.

Stable sections were preserved. The large blocks further behind provide structural support to contain the earth. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

Stable sections were preserved. The large blocks further behind provide structural support to contain the earth. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

The sourcing of new, ‘old-look’ bricks proved to be quite challenging, as the colour and texture of the bricks of the original ha-ha varies considerably along its length. In the end different bricks and mortar mixes were used in different sections.

Concrete blocks provide the containment structure for the sections that had to be rebuilt. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

Concrete blocks provide the containment structure for the sections that had to be rebuilt. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

The stable sections of the ha-ha were preserved as much as possible and repointed with traditional mortar. As time goes by the new brickwork will further blend in with the old.

An original section of ha-ha is repointed. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

An original section of ha-ha is repointed. ©Shaun Wilkes/National Trust

A significant proportion of the funding for this work was provided by Natural England.

 

The English taste for pietre dure

February 11, 2015
Section of the pietre dure table in the Library at Charlecote Park, purchased by George Lucy from dealer Thomas Emmerson in 1824. Inv. no. 532986. ©National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

Section of the pietre dure table in the Library at Charlecote Park, purchased by George Lucy from dealer Thomas Emmerson in 1824. Inv. no. 532986. ©National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

The English taste for Italian pietre dure, or hard stone mosaic work, goes way back – that much is clear from a quick perusal of the new book  Roman Splendour, English Arcadia, about the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead.

Section of a pietre dure table-top made in Rome in about 1580, at Powis Castle, probably acquired by George Herbert, 2nd Earl of Powis, in the 1770s or 1780s. Inv. no. 1181054. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Section of a pietre dure table-top made in Rome in about 1580, at Powis Castle, probably acquired by George Herbert, 2nd Earl of Powis, in the 1770s or 1780s. Inv. no. 1181054. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

One of the earliest examples is the so-called Great Pavement in Westminster Abbey, which was created in 1269 by the Roman craftsman Petrus Oderisius or Odericus. But many English palaces and country houses subsequently also acquired tables, cabinets and caskets incorporating pietre dure.

Cabinet mounted with pietre dure panels, made in Florence in about 1650, at Chirk Castle. Inv. no. 1170817. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Cabinet mounted with pietre dure panels, made in Florence in about 1650, at Chirk Castle. Inv. no. 1170817. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

At Chirk Castle there is an ebony cabinet mounted with Florentine pietre dure plaques dating to about 1650, probably picked up by Sir Thomas Myddelton during his Grand Tour in the early 1670s. The central panel shows the mythical Orpheus, and the other panels show various animals, whom Orpheus famously charmed with his music.

The scagliola chimneypiece in the Queen's Closet at Ham House. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The scagliola chimneypiece in the Queen’s Closet at Ham House. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

At Ham House there is a chimneypiece made of scagliola or imitation marble which appears to be an expression of the same taste for Italian marble. It was made by the Roman craftsman Baldessare Artima for the Duke of Lauderdale in about 1673.

Detail from one of a pair of scagliola table-tops with landscapes and flowers, made by Don Petro Belloni in 1754, at Uppark. Inv. no. 137667 ©National Trust Images/Angelo Hornak

Detail from one of a pair of scagliola table-tops with landscapes and flowers, made by Don Petro Belloni in 1754, at Uppark. Inv. no. 137667 ©National Trust Images/Angelo Hornak

A scagliola table top at Uppark closely follows the style of many pietre dure panels in having floral motifs and a landscape cartouche against a black background. It was made by Don Petro Belloni near Florence for Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh in 1754.

English chinoiserie cabinet incorporating oriental lacquer, Florentine pietre dure and ivory medallions, made in about 1754, in the Little Parlour at Uppark. Inv. no. 137638. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

English chinoiserie cabinet incorporating oriental lacquer, Florentine pietre dure and ivory medallions, made in about 1754, in the Little Parlour at Uppark. Inv. no. 137638. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

The same Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh also purchased several Florentine pietre dure plaques which he then had inserted, together with ivory medallions and oriental lacquer panels, into a chinoiserie cabinet possibly made by William Hallett in about 1754. It was common for the Chinese style to be combined with the Gothic, but a mixture of chinoiserie and Grand Tour taste in one piece of furniture is much rarer.

Ebony cabinet mounted with lapis lazuli, made in Rome in about 1640, at Belton House. Inv. no. 435082. ©National Trust Images/Dennis Gilbert

Ebony cabinet mounted with lapis lazuli, made in Rome in about 1640, at Belton House. Inv. no. 435082. ©National Trust Images/Dennis Gilbert

An architecturally-shaped cabinet inlaid with lapis lazuli, made in Rome in about 1640, survives at Belton House. It may have been acquired Sir John Brownlow, later Lord Tyrconnell, during his Grand Tour in 1711.

Ebony cabinet mounted in gilt bronze and pietre dure, made in Rome in about 1610, at West Wycombe Park. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Ebony cabinet mounted in gilt bronze and pietre dure, made in Rome in about 1610, at West Wycombe Park. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The Roman cabinet at West Wycombe Park, made in about 1610 and again with architectural features, was probably purchased by Sir Francis Dashwood, later Lord le Despencer, when he visited Rome in 1740.

Ebony casket with gilt bronze mounts incorporating hard stone fruits and with panels of pietre dure, made in Florence, at The Vyne. Inv. no. 718777. ©National Trust Images/James Mortimer

Ebony casket with gilt bronze mounts incorporating hard stone fruits and with panels of pietre dure, made in Florence, at The Vyne. Inv. no. 718777. ©National Trust Images/James Mortimer

Pietre dure were also used for the decoration of smaller casket-like cabinets, such as the one at The Vyne acquired by John Chute in Florence in the 1740s.

Section of a pietre dure table top, made in Rome in about 1580, said to have been owned by the Borghese family and purchased by George Lucy at the Beckford sale in 1823, in the Great Hall at Charlecote Park. Inv. no. 532954. ©National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

Section of a pietre dure table top, made in Rome in about 1580, said to have been owned by the Borghese family and purchased by George Lucy at the Beckford sale in 1823, in the Great Hall at Charlecote Park. Inv. no. 532954. ©National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

The English interest in pietre dure persisted in the nineteenth century, the wealthy aesthete William Beckford being a notable collector. A number of pieces now at Charlecote Park were purchased by George Lucy at the sale of Beckford’s collection in 1823.

And these are just some of the pietre dure objects in the care of the National Trust. The book mentions many more examples of this English taste – including the splendid so-called Badminton cabinet, now in Liechtenstein.

Opening up the Sixtus cabinet

February 4, 2015
The Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

It is not often that a whole book is devoted to one piece of furniture, but the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead amply rewards such treatment.

The attic storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The attic storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The newly published book Roman Splendour, English Arcadia, by Simon Swynfen Jervis and Dudley Dodd, celebrates the visual impact of this extraordinary cabinet, its architectural complexity, lavish gilt-bronze mounts and dazzling semi-previous stones.

The Composite third storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The Composite third storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The book also explores how the cabinet was made in about 1585 for Pope Sixtus V, who rose from humble origins to become the rebuilder of Rome, and how it was handed down in the dynasty of his relatives, the Peretti family, who joined the ranks of the Roman princely elite.

The Corinthian second storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The Corinthian second storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The cabinet came to Stourhead in the 1740s, after it had been bought by the banker Henry Hoare, ‘the Magnificent’. It was a key element in Hoare’s project to transform both the house and the garden at Stourhead into an arcadian realm inspired by Italian art and the classical world.

The podium and Ionic first storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©2010 John Hammond

The podium and Ionic first storey of the Sixtus cabinet at Stourhead. ©2010 John Hammond

Although it is strictly speaking a piece of furniture, the Sixtus cabinet has the impact of a luxurious model building and the aura of a tabernacle or a reliquary.

The pedestal for the Sixtus cabinet, made for Henry Hoare in the shape of a triumphal arch. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The pedestal for the Sixtus cabinet, made for Henry Hoare in the shape of a triumphal arch. ©National Trust/John Hammond

The book can be obtained from the National Trust online shop.

William Chambers, Chinese design guru

January 22, 2015
Plate 4 from Sir William Chambers's book Designs of Chinese Buildings (1757). ©British Library

Plate 4 from Sir William Chambers’s book Designs of Chinese Buildings (1757). ©British Library

This evening I will be giving a talk on the Chinese designs of the architect William Chambers, as part of the seminar series on the history of gardens and designed landscapes organised by the Institute of Historical Reseach.

Plate 2 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Plate 2 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

I cannot give a full preview of the talk here, but essentially it will be about the pervasive influence of Chambers’s 1757 book Designs of Chinese Buildings on the appearance of chinoiserie garden pavilions across Europe.

Plate 5 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Plate 5 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Chambers claimed to have written the book to correct European misconceptions about Chinese architecture which were being perpetuated by the authors of fanciful and frivolous ‘Chinese’ pattern books.

Plate 10 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Plate 10 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Ironically, the popularity of Chambers’s ‘correct’ book meant that his designs were quickly adapted by others and used to design yet more cheerfully fantastical pavilions, especially as part of the so-called jardins anglo-chinois which were popular in France in the 1770s and 1780s.

Plate 14 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

Plate 14 from Designs of Chinese Buildings. ©British Library

But in some ways Chambers had the last laugh, as his version of Chinese architecture became the ‘correct’ chinoiserie style for about the next hundred years.

Mount Stewart demesne to be opened to the public

January 20, 2015
Aerial view of Mount Stewart. The woodland areas mark the extent of the demesne. ©National Trust

Aerial view of Mount Stewart. The woodland areas mark the extent of the demesne. ©National Trust

As the project to restore the house at Mount Stewart nears completion, it has been announced that the adjoining historic demesne will also be opened to the public.

The big house at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

The big house at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

Part of the demesne, which was the core estate associated with the big house, has been accepted by the Government in lieu of inheritance tax and allocated to the National Trust. Another part of the demesne has been simultaneously purchased by the National Trust, keeping this historic estate together and reuniting it with the house.

The Temple of the Winds at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/Peter Aprahamian

The Temple of the Winds at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/Peter Aprahamian

The demesne was acquired by Alexander Stewart in 1744. His son, the first Marquess of Londonderry, commissioned James ‘Athenian’ Stuart to build the romantic Temple of the Winds on the shores of Strangford Lough in 1782-3. In the twentieth century Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, created the now celebrated gardens, which she gave to the National Trust in 1957 (and which I have mentioned before).

The lake at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

The lake at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

The parts of the demesne that have already been opened to the public are the walled garden and the dairy. There are plans to revive the rose garden and replant fruit trees. In the longer term the aim is to restore the vineries and peach houses, and to improve access to the woodland.

Woodland garden at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

Woodland garden at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/David Armstrong

This project is being supported by funding from the Garfield Weston Foundation.

Mr Turner: the exhibition

January 13, 2015
J.M.W. Turner, Petworth Park with Lord Egremont and his Dogs. ©Tate

J.M.W. Turner, Petworth Park with Lord Egremont and his Dogs. ©Tate

A new exhibition at Petworth House has been inspired by Mike Leigh’s recent film Mr Turner and celebrates the life and work of the Romantic landscape painter Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851).

View of Petworth House, with the lawn shown in Turner's painting. ©Martin Offer

View of Petworth House, with the lawn shown in Turner’s painting. ©Martin Offer

Turner visited Petworth repeatedly between 1809 and 1837 as the guest of his patron George Wyndham, 3rd Earl of Egremont (1751-1807). He created many pictures in oils and watercolour there. Some of those have always remained at Petworth, while others have returned on loan for this exhibition.

Timothy Spall as Turner in the Old Library at Petworth. ©Simon Mein and Thin Man Films

Timothy Spall as Turner in the Old Library at Petworth. ©Simon Mein and Thin Man Films

Visitors will also be able to see objects owned by Turner, such as his pocket paint book and the large easel thought to be the one depicted in the famous watercolour The Artist and His Admirers. That picture shows a scene in Petworth’s Old Library, which the artist was using as a studio.

Turner's 1827 watercolour The Artist and his Admirers, used as inspiration for the film Mr Turner. ©Tate

Turner’s 1827 watercolour The Artist and his Admirers, used as inspiration for the film Mr Turner. ©Tate

Petworth House was used as one of the locations for the film Mr Turner, starring Timothy Spall as the brilliant but awkward artist.

Set created by Suzie Davis in the Old Library at Petworth. The replica Turner seascapes were created by Charlie Cobb. ©Scott Ramsey

Set created by Suzie Davis in the Old Library at Petworth. The replica Turner seascapes were created by Charlie Cobb. ©Scott Ramsey

The exhibition includes a recreation of Turner’s studio at Petworth, put together by set designer Suzie Davis.

Timothy Spall channelling Turner. ©Simon Mein and Thin Man Films

Timothy Spall channelling Turner. ©Simon Mein and Thin Man Films

Director Mike Leigh said ‘Petworth wrote itself into the film rather than us having to think of possible stately homes; it is such an extraordinary, and rare, and rarified place.’

Portrait of J.M.W. Turner by John Phillip. ©National Portrait Gallery, London

Portrait of J.M.W. Turner by John Phillip. ©National Portrait Gallery, London

The exhibition, which is on until 11 March, was assembled by Andrew Loukes, curator at Petworth, and Dr Jacqueline Riding, research consultant on Mr Turner.

A closer look at the Uppark Chinese wallpaper

January 8, 2015
Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Recently we have been able to have a closer look at the Chinese wallpaper fragments from Uppark, which have been in storage. They were revealed under later wallpaper in the Little Parlour at Uppark following a fire in 1989 and are proving to be very important.

The Little Parlour at Uppark, where the Chinese wallpaper hung between about 1750 and 1770. The chinoiserie cabinet dates from the same period. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

The Little Parlour at Uppark, where the Chinese wallpaper hung between about 1750 and 1770. The chinoiserie cabinet dates from the same period. ©National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

We knew that the Chinese wallpaper at Uppark was early, of the block-printed type that appeared in about 1750. It is clearly similar in style to other surviving block-printed Chinese wallpapers from that time, such as those at Felbrigg Hall, Ightham Mote, and Woburn Abbey.

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. The motif of the two pheasants on a rock is also found in the Chinese wallpaper at Ightham Mote. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. The motif of the two pheasants on a rock is also found in the Chinese wallpaper at Ightham Mote. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

But now we have been able to confirm that parts of this wallpaper are in fact identical to some of the wallpaper drops at Ightham Mote. The related section of the Ightham wallpaper can be seen in this previous post.

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138491. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138491. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

The colours of the Uppark wallpaper are remarkably fresh. Although it obviously suffered from the effects of the fire, it had only been exposed to light for about twenty years, having been covered over with another wallpaper in about 1770. So the surviving fragments make for an interesting comparison with the Ightham paper, in which the colours have changed due to over-painting with oil paint in about 1900.

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. The rock at left has been cut out from another section and applied to extend the length of the paper. The lady at right is probably also an addition. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138490. The rock at left has been cut out from another section and applied to extend the length of the paper. The lady at right is probably also an addition. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

The fragments also provide evidence of the artful cutting and pasting regularly deployed by the paper hangers to make the scenic Chinese wallpaper fit particular rooms. In one section rocks, flowers and a bird have been added to extend the paper at the bottom. The lady appearing nearby seems to have been added as well, probably taken from a different Chinese print or wallpaper.

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, with a Chinese border paper representing mottled bamboo fretwork. On the left a different cut paper border can be seen underneath the bamboo border. Inv. no. 138497. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, with a Chinese border paper representing mottled bamboo fretwork. On the left a different cut paper border can be seen underneath the bamboo border. Inv. no. 138497. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Some of the fragments have the remains of border papers, which were commonly used to frame sections of wallpaper. One of them appears to be Chinese, a trompe l’oeil representation of mottled bamboo fretwork.

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138494. The fragment includes a section of a European cut paper border in a chinoiserie fretwork pattern. Towards the right there is evidence of the paper hanger cutting the wallpaper in a serpentine line to disguise the overlap with a different section of wallpaper. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

Part of a fragment of Chinese wallpaper from the Little Parlour at Uppark, inv. no. 138494. The fragment includes a section of a European cut paper border in a chinoiserie fretwork pattern. Towards the right there is evidence of the paper hanger cutting the wallpaper in a serpentine line to disguise the overlap with a different section of wallpaper. ©National Trust/Sarah Foster

The other appears to be European, cut in a chinoiserie fretwork pattern reminiscent of the decorations on mid-eighteenth century furniture. In one area the cut paper can be seen emerging from underneath a damaged section of the ‘bamboo’ paper – perhaps evidence of a change of mind.

 

Sarah Staniforth awarded CBE

January 2, 2015
Sarah Staniforth ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Sarah Staniforth ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Sarah Staniforth, our former Museums and Collections Director, has been appointed Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in the New Year’s Honours list. She stepped down from her National Trust position last year, although she is still involved in various honorary and voluntary roles.

Sarah was made a CBE for services to heritage. She worked for the National Trust for nearly thirty years and is known as an international authority on conservation practice. She is also currently the president of the International Institute for Conservation (IIC).

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In recent years Sarah was closely involved with the publication of the National Trust Manual of Housekeeping (2008, updated 2011). In 2013 she published the reader Historical Perspectives on Preventive Conservation.

Having worked with Sarah for a number of years, I was delighted to hear this news.


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