Chinese style at Versailles and Woburn

June 6, 2014
View of the chinoiserie pavilion and carousel near the Petit Trianon at Versailles, by Claude-Louis Châtelet (1753-1795), black chalk, watercolour and gouache, 1786. ©Château de Versailles

View of the chinoiserie pavilion and carousel near the Petit Trianon at Versailles, by Claude-Louis Châtelet (1753-1795), black chalk, watercolour and gouache, 1786. ©Château de Versailles

In a comment on a previous post, François-Marc Chaballier kindly alerted us to a current exhibition entitled ‘China at Versailles’, about the diplomatic and cultural links between the French and Chinese courts in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. I immediately ordered the catalogue and am eagerly awaiting it.

Looking at the exhibition’s web pages I saw the above picture of a chinoiserie pavilion built near the Petit Trianon at Versailles for Queen Marie-Antoinette in about 1776.

The Chinese Dairy at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire. ©Woburn Abbey

The Chinese Dairy at Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire. ©Woburn Abbey

The low, stretched-out silhouette of this pavilion reminded me of the so-called Chinese Dairy at Woburn Abbey, which was designed by Henry Holland for the 5th Duke of Bedford in 1787 and completed in 1794.

This application of the Chinese style to an ornamental dairy is unique in Britain. In France, however, the fashion for ornamental dairies (as described by Meredith Martin in her recent book Dairy Queens) coincided with a taste for garden pavilions in the Chinese style. The idealisation of milking, butter-making and country life in general chimed with the ‘physiocratic’ view of China as an admirably stable and productive agricultural society.

The chinoiserie pavilion cum dairy grotto in the garden of Claude Baudard de Saint James, from J.-C. Krafft, Plans, coupes, élévations des plus belles maisons et hotels construits à Paris et dans les environs (c. 1802).

The chinoiserie pavilion cum dairy grotto in the garden of Claude Baudard de Saint James, from J.-C. Krafft, Plans, coupes, élévations des plus belles maisons et hotels construits à Paris et dans les environs (c. 1802).

Marie-Antoinette had dairies included in her Hameau or ornamental village at Versailles in the mid-1780s. Her husband, Louis XVI, built another one for her at the Château de Rambouillet in 1787.

The link between China and dairies was made even more explicit in the garden structure built by François-Joseph Bélanger for Claude Baudard de Saint James at Neuilly-sur-Seine in the late 1780s: a chinoiserie pavilion with a dairy in a ‘grotto’ immediately below it.

Henry Holland is known to have visited Paris in 1787. It seems likely that he saw at least some of these pavilions and dairies and that they informed his design of the Chinese Dairy at Woburn – but this is just a hunch and needs more research.

A Roman quartet returns to Wimpole

June 3, 2014
Detail of the bust of the emperor Caracallarecently returned to Wimpole Hall (inv. no. 2900080). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Detail of the bust of the emperor Caracalla recently returned to Wimpole Hall (inv. no. 2900080). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Four seventeenth-century Roman marble busts have recently returned to Wimpole Hall after a 60-year absence.

The four Roman busts back in the entrance hall at Wimpole. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The four Roman busts back in the entrance hall at Wimpole. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Two of the busts, of the emperor Caracalla and of a man described as ‘a philosopher’, were accepted in lieu of inheritance tax by the Government and allocated to Wimpole.

The bust of the 'philosopher', whose identity is yet to be further researched (inv. no. 2900081). ©National Trust/Phil MynottPhilosopher Phil Mynott

The bust of the ‘philosopher’, whose identity is yet to be further researched (inv. no. 2900081). ©National Trust/Phil MynottPhilosopher Phil Mynott

The other two, of the emperor Trajan and of another as yet unidentified emperor, were purchased by private treaty with the help of grants from the Art Fund, from a fund set up by the late the Hon. Simon Sainsbury, the Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Levy bequest and other gifts and bequests.

The busts of an as yet unidentified emperor (left) and Trajan (right) in the inner hall,  flanking curator Wendy Monkhouse, who originally made the case for their acquisition. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The busts of an as yet unidentified emperor (left) and Trajan (right) in the inner hall, flanking curator Wendy Monkhouse, who originally made the case for their acquisition. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The busts are back on display in the entrance hall, where they were previously, and they join a fifth bust of the emperor Marcus Aurelius which had remained at Wimpole.

Unidentified emperor (inv. no. 2900083). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Unidentified emperor (inv. no. 2900083). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The Wimpole provenance of this group of busts can be traced back to at least the 1770s, but they may have been part of of the collection of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford (1689-1741) who, apart from being a voracious bibliophile, also collected coins and antiquities.

The emperor Trajan (inv. no. 2900082). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott Phil Mynott

The emperor Trajan (inv. no. 2900082). ©National Trust/Phil Mynott Phil Mynott

The busts were made in Rome in the seventeenth century in response to the strong demand across Europe for objects evoking Roman history. Bust such as these referenced the lives and achievements of the different Roman emperors.

The emperor Marcus Aurelius (inv. no. 208037) on the great staircase. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The emperor Marcus Aurelius (inv. no. 208037) on the great staircase. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Trajan and Marcus Aurelius were among the good guys overseeing Rome’s golden age. The fratricidal Caracalla was definitely a bad boy, but his brooding countenance – and the fact that he came to power while in York – made his bust popular in eighteenth-century England.

Julia Glynn of Cliveden Conservation preparing the bust of Caracalla for display. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

Julia Glynn of Cliveden Conservation preparing the bust of Caracalla for display. ©National Trust/Phil Mynott

The busts have been prepared for display by Clivenden Conservation and placed on the carved wooden plinths made for them by the Cambridge firm of Rattee and Kett in about 1860.

A Taste for China

May 29, 2014

9780199950980

There has recently been a spate of books examining the west’s historical fascination with east Asia through the lens of literature and the history of ideas. I have previously featured Chi-Ming Yang’s Performing China and Yu Liu’s Seeds of a Different Eden.

Pieter van Roestraten (1629–1700), Teapot, Ginger Jar and Slave Candlestick, c. 1695. ©Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Pieter van Roestraten (1629–1700), Teapot, Ginger Jar and Slave Candlestick, c. 1695. ©Victoria and Albert Museum, London

A new book by Eugenia Zuroski Jenkins, entitled A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism, once again approaches the subject by way of literary history. But at the same time it also sheds new light on a question that has long puzzled me: why were China and Chinese things so highly regarded in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe?

Chinese porcelain teapot, Zhangzhou ware, c. 1650-1670 with European silver-gilt mounts, c. 1660-1680, at Ham House (inv. no. 1139006). ©NTPL/Bill Batten

Chinese porcelain teapot, Zhangzhou ware, c. 1650-1670 with European silver-gilt mounts, c. 1660-1680, at Ham House (inv. no. 1139006). ©NTPL/Bill Batten

One of Zuroski Jenkins’s answers revolves around the theory of perception formulated by John Locke (1632-1704). According to Locke the mind is an empty receptacle which is gradually filled by external impressions and perceptions. In this view sophistication equals importation: the mind of a person of taste is like a collector’s cabinet, filled with wondrous things from across the globe.

This seems to explain why seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Europeans seemed to be so keen on collecting objects from cultures they barely understood, and to create decorative schemes that combined eastern and western styles without any sense of incongruity.

Pieter van Roestraten (1629–1700), Still Life with Silver Wine Decanter, Tulip, Yixing Teapot and Globe, c. 1690. ©Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Pieter van Roestraten (1629–1700), Still Life with Silver Wine Decanter, Tulip, Yixing Teapot and Globe, c. 1690. ©Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Zuroski Jenkins also argues that in the course of the eighteenth century there occurred a shift from this cosmopolitan idea of taste to a more polarised opposition between the self and the other, which increasingly defined China as something that stood in contrast to the British sense of identity.

These are just a few snippets from Zuroski Jenkins’s complex book, which I now want to reread to savour her analysis more fully. But it confirms my hunch that ‘China’ in 1700 and ‘China’ in 1800 were two radically different things.

Stamford Hospital revisited

May 23, 2014
The Saloon at Dunham Massey taken back to its appearance as a hospital ward during World War I. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

The Saloon at Dunham Massey taken back to its appearance as a hospital ward during World War I. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

During the First World War Dunham Massey was used as an auxiliary hospital for wounded soldiers, known as the Stamford Hospital. Some of the hospital wards have now been recreated for a period of two years to mark the centenary of World War I.

The Saloon before it was temporarily changed back into a hospital ward. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The Saloon before it was temporarily changed back into a hospital ward. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Staff and volunteers at Dunham researched the stories of those involved, including the Countess of Stamford, who offered the house for use as a hospital, Sister Catherine Bennett, who was in charge of day-to-day treatment, and Lady Jane Grey, Lady Stamford’s daughter who worked there as a nurse.

The Great Gallery at Dunham displayed as a store room, as it was during World War I. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

The Great Gallery at Dunham displayed as a store room, as it was during World War I. ©National Trust Images/James Dobson

Exhibition designers Outside Studios and Scenetec have recreated the appearance of some of the rooms as they were during the First World War, based on surviving photographs and other archive material.

The Great Gallery before its recent redisplay. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The Great Gallery before its recent redisplay. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Treatment reports at the foot of the beds record the injuries and progress of individual patients. Inevitably, some died, others recovered, went back to the front and were killed, while others survived the war.

The Robinia pseudoacacia trees on the mount at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Nick Meers

The Robinia pseudoacacia trees on the mount at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Nick Meers

Some of the smells and sounds of the ward have been recreated and costumed interpreters reenact scenes between patients, nursing staff and family visitors. I found the combination of sensory impressions and factual information very powerful and affecting.

The garden at Dunham was looking very beautiful when I visited – one hopes it had the same soothing effect a hundred years ago.

A closer look at Dyrham Park

May 20, 2014
Dyrham Park ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

Dyrham Park ©National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

From a distance historic houses can appear almost eternal. But a closer look usually reveals some evidence of the ravages of time.

Experts looking at the repairs needed to the roof at Dyrham Park, South Gloucestershire. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Experts inspecting Dyrham’s roof. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Dyrham Park has been receiving quite a lot of scrutiny recently. Its roof is now over 200 years old and beyond its natural life.

Patch repairs on the roof at Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Patch repairs on the roof at Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Patch repairs are no longer sufficient and the roof needs a complete overhaul.

Spalling stonework on the roof at Dyrham ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Spalling stonework on the roof at Dyrham ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Some of the stonework is also beginning to fail, exacerbated by the freezing and thawing of excess rainwater. So as well as urgent stone repairs the house needs improved gutters to prevent future damage.

Damaged stonework on the west front of Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Damaged stonework on the west front of Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

In addition access to the orangery roof needs to be made safer, so that high-level maintenance can be carried out more frequently and efficiently.

Water damage in the orangery at Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

Water damage in the orangery at Dyrham. ©National Trust Images/Chris Lacey

That is why we are trying to raise £500,000 towards the total cost of £3.54 million. Any donation is welcome, and can be made here.

Dunham Massey through the eyes of Vermeer

May 16, 2014
The stables and clockhouse at Dunham Massey. ©National Trust Images/Matthew Antrobus

The stables and clockhouse at Dunham Massey. ©National Trust Images/Matthew Antrobus

As I visited Dunham Massey a few days ago I experienced a kind of déjà vu.

The north front of the main house at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Matthew Antrobus

The north front of the main house at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Matthew Antrobus

The mellow red brickwork of the stables and the house, seen from across the moat, suddenly reminded me of Vermeer’s View of Delft

The clock tower on the stables, with the doors painted in the shade of blue used across the Dunham estate. ©National Trust Images/Neil Campbell-Sharp

The clock tower on the stables, with the doors painted in the shade of blue used across the Dunham estate. ©National Trust Images/Neil Campbell-Sharp

Perhaps it was the changeable weather we were having, with rainclouds alternating with sunshine, just like in the painting. But what Dunham and Vermeer’s townscape also have in common is an intriguing mixture of grand stillness and layered detail.

The orangery, probably built in the second half of the eighteenth century. ©National Trust Images/Neil Campbell-Sharp

The orangery, probably built in the second half of the eighteenth century. ©National Trust Images/Neil Campbell-Sharp

The house, service quarters, garden and estate were built, added to and remodeled by successive generations of the Booth and Grey families between the eighteenth and the twentieth centuries.

The inner courtyard at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Andrew Butler

The inner courtyard at Dunham. ©National Trust Images/Andrew Butler

Having grown, been pruned and regrown in this organic way, the house seems to have the same quiet poignancy and hidden bustle as Delft did when Vermeer saw it.

A man and his purse

May 8, 2014
Cornelius Janssen van Ceulen, portrait of Sir Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage. ©National Trust/Amy Howe

Cornelius Janssen van Ceulen, portrait of Sir Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage. ©National Trust/Amy Howe

Melford Hall has recently acquired a portrait of one of its seventeenth-century owners, Sir Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage (c. 1586-1635). Previously only one likeness of him was known, in a private collection in Yorkshire.

©National Trust/Amy Howe

©National Trust/Amy Howe

The newly acquired picture was long thought to be of John Williams (1582-1650), a seventeenth-century Archbishop of York. But when it was recently consigned for sale at Christie’s the red purse of office bearing the cipher ‘HMR’ shown in the picture caused some interest.

©National Trust/Amy Howe

©National Trust/Amy Howe

‘HMR’ stands for ‘Henrietta Maria Regina’, or Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of King Charles I, and the sitter would therefore have been the queen’s chancellor, a post not held by John Williams.

©National Trust/Amy Howe

©National Trust/Amy Howe

But Sir Thomas Savage was the queen’s chancellor from the mid-1620s until his death in 1635. Moreover, comparison with the Yorkshire portrait suggested this was indeed Savage.

©National Trust/Amy Howe

©National Trust/Amy Howe

The National Trust purchased this portrait at auction in April 2013 and sent it to the Hamilton Kerr Institute for conservation. Cleaning revealed the signature of the artist, Cornelius Jonson (or Cornelius Janssen van Ceulen, to give him his original Flemish name), and the date 1632.

English School, portrait of Lady Elizabeth Darcy, Viscountess Savage and Countess Rivers. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

English School, portrait of Lady Elizabeth Darcy, Viscountess Savage and Countess Rivers. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The picture is now on display at Melford near that of Savage’s wife, Lady Elizabeth Darcy (1581-1651). Lord and Lady Savage extended and refurbished Melford Hall, but appear to have overspent. That and the sacking of the house at the start of the Civil War forced their son to sell it in 1649.

Chinese wallpaper in National Trust houses

May 6, 2014
Detail from the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig, hung in the 1770s. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

Detail from the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig, hung in the 1770s. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

As some of you will know, Andrew Bush, Dr Helen Clifford and I have been preparing a catalogue of the Chinese wallpapers in the care of the National Trust. This little publication is now available through the National Trust online shop at an introductory price of £9.99.

Detail from the Chinese wallpaper in the State Dressing Room at Nostell Priory, supplied by Thomas Chippendale in 1771. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

Detail from the Chinese wallpaper in the State Dressing Room at Nostell Priory, supplied by Thomas Chippendale in 1771. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

We hope the catalogue will widen the interest into these beautiful wallpapers. We also hope it will lead to more exchange of information, as so much is still unclear about the origins and development of Chinese wallpaper.

The Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

Writing the catalogue has been a voyage of discovery. For instance, we hadn’t realised before how closely related the wallpapers at Erddig and Nostell Priory actually are. Although they are both painted by hand, some motifs are practically identical, meaning that the same models or templates must have been used in the making of both papers.

The Chinese wallpaper in the State Dressing Room at Nostell Priory. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

The Chinese wallpaper in the State Dressing Room at Nostell Priory. ©National Trust Images/Andreas von Einsiedel

There are also strong similarities between these two wallpapers and the ones preserved at Cobham Hall – now a school – and Milton Manor  House – still privately owned. Yet another one hung at Ashburnham Place and is now at Blair House, the presidential guest house in Washington DC – with thanks to Michael Shepherd and Robert M. Kelly for telling us about it. Through these discoveries we can now begin to identify a ’1760s-70s style’ in Chinese floral wallpapers.

Detail of the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig. ©National trust/Andrew Bush

Detail of the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Erddig. ©National trust/Andrew Bush

Investigations by Lucy Johnson at Woburn Abbey have also just brought to light fragments of a Chinese wallpaper hung in 1752 which clearly relates to the wallpapers at Felbrigg Hall and Ightham Mote.

Detail of the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Nostell Priory. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

Detail of the Chinese wallpaper in the State Bedroom at Nostell Priory. ©National Trust/Andrew Bush

We are keen to explore the links with Chinese wallpapers elsewhere in Europe and America, as well as the original Chinese art-historical context. Organising a conference will be next on our agenda. So do please get in touch if you look after or know of anything to do with historic Chinese wallpapers.

The library at Mount Stewart secured

April 30, 2014
View of Lady Londonderry's Sitting Room at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/Peter Aprahamian

View of Lady Londonderry’s Sitting Room at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/Peter Aprahamian

It has just been announced that the library at Mount Stewart has been acquired by the National Trust from the estate of the late Lady Mairi Bury. These books, spread across a number of rooms in the house, document the intellectual, cultural and political life of the Vane-Tempest-Stewart family since the eighteenth century.

Lady Londonderry's Sitting Room, Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Lady Londonderry’s Sitting Room, Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The library was purchased for just under £100,000, with funding from the Royal Oak Foundation, the B.H. Breslauer Foundation, the Northern Ireland Museums Council, the Friends of the National Libraries, Doreen Burns and Terence and Di Kyle.

View of the Castlereagh Room at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

View of the Castlereagh Room at Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Some of the books were owned by Charles Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry (1878-1949) and his wife Edith (1879-1959). They were both actively engaged in politics and in addition Edith was a notable gardener and cultural patroness, all of which is reflected in the books they collected.

The Castlereagh Room, Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The Castlereagh Room, Mount Stewart. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

In his study of northern Irish country house libraries, The Big House Library in Ireland, Mark Purcell notes how the ownership inscriptions in the books at Mount Stewart provide evocative evidence of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century family and social networks.

Bookplate of Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, incorporating a portrait by Philip de Laszlo. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Bookplate of Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, incorporating a portrait by Philip de Laszlo. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

A first edition of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park (1814) at Mount Stewart, for instance, belonged to one of Lord Londonderry’s ancestors, Amelia Ann Hobart (1772-1829), while an 1813 copy of Pride and Prejudice owned by her half-sister Caroline, Lady Suffield (d.1850), remains at their parents’ house, Blickling Hall.

A note on one of the bookshelves in the Castlereagh Room at Mount Stewart, with instructions to borrowers. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

A note on one of the bookshelves in the Castlereagh Room at Mount Stewart, with instructions to borrowers. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Other books that have ended up at Mount Stewart were once in the possession of Amelia and Caroline’s great aunt, Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk (c.1688-1767), the mistress of George II who built the exquisitely Palladian Marble Hill House.

Francis Hayman, the sculptural painter

April 24, 2014
Sacrifice to Apollo, from the Arch of Constantine, by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Sacrifice to Apollo, from the Arch of Constantine, by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

A group of five grisaille paintings by Francis Hayman (1708-76) at Blickling Hall is currently undergoing conservation treatment.

The Blickling Haymans being treated. ©National Trust

The Blickling Haymans being treated. ©National Trust

Conservators Sally Woodcock and Polly Saltmarsh are consolidating and cleaning the surface of the pictures, filling in surface cracks and strengthening their frames. The work has been funded by the Ashford Trust and the Norfolk National Trust Centre.

Mercury delivering a message to Jupiter and Juno, with Neptune in attendance, from an antique relief in the Museo Angelonio, by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, images supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Mercury delivering a message to Jupiter and Juno, with Neptune in attendance, from an antique relief in the Museo Angelonio, by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, images supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Hayman was a versatile artist who produced portraits, history paintings, pictures showing scenes from plays and decorative works such as this group.

The Emperor Trajan sacrificing to Mars Victorious (from the Arch of Constantine), by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The Emperor Trajan sacrificing to Mars Victorious (from the Arch of Constantine), by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

His biggest commission was to paint about fifty pictures to decorate the pavilions and supper boxes at Vauxhall Gardens, the popular pleasure grounds on the south bank of the river Thames.

Portrait of the sculptor Peter Scheemakers (1691–1781), by Francis Hayman, at the Royal College of Physicians, London. ©Royal College of Physicians, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Portrait of the sculptor Peter Scheemakers (1691–1781), by Francis Hayman, at the Royal College of Physicians, London. ©Royal College of Physicians, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The Blickling pictures had a similar decorative function, but hung in the private space of the library.

Portrait of Jonathan Tyers and his family, by Francis Hayman, in the National Portrait Gallery, London. ©National Portrait Gallery

Portrait of Jonathan Tyers and his family, by Francis Hayman, in the National Portrait Gallery, London. ©National Portrait Gallery

Sculpture seems to have been a recurring motif in Hayman’s work: he painted portraits of several sculptors and he included sculptural elements in his other works too.

Figures crowning a statue of Hercules (from the Arch of Constantine), by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Figures crowning a statue of Hercules (from the Arch of Constantine), by Francis Hayman, at Blickling Hall. ©National Trust, image supplied by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The Blickling grisailles will be on view again from the second half of May.


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