The world and his dog

Peter Palmer, huntsman to Sir John William de la Pole, 6th Bt, by Thomas Beach, 1793, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Peter Palmer, huntsman to Sir John William de la Pole, 6th Bt, by Thomas Beach, 1793, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

I have just been looking at the six volumes on the oil paintings owned by the National Trust which have been published by the Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF).

Fury, a dappled grey, and his groom, by Francis Sartorius I, 1784, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Fury, a dappled grey, and his groom, by Francis Sartorius I, 1784, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The Public Catalogue Foundation is an extraordinary venture, in some ways reminiscent of Pevsner’s Buildings of England series, which has succeeded in digitising the UK’s publicly owned oil paintings.

Bruen, a spaniel, and Squirrel, a black horse, by Francis Sartorius I, 1790, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Bruen, a spaniel, and Squirrel, a black horse, by Francis Sartorius I, 1790, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The database can be accessed digitally via the Your Paintings site, but the PCF is also publishing a series of hardback catalogues, six of which cover the National Trust’s collections.

A groom, two greys and a currick in a courtyard, by Francis Sartorius I, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

A groom, two greys and a currick in a courtyard, by Francis Sartorius I, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

It is wonderful to see the collections of individual historic houses spread out across the pages, in all their variety, splendour and incongruity. Some are undoubted masterpieces by famous artists while others, though more humble, speak eloquently of social attitudes, changing fashions and family preoccupations.

Atlas, Master Pole's pony, which he rode at four year's old, by Francis Sartorius I, c. 1785-6, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

Atlas, Master Pole’s pony, which he rode at four year’s old, by Francis Sartorius I, c. 1785-6, at Antony. ©National Trust, image provided by the Public Catalogue Foundation

The pictures shown here are from the collection of the Carew and Pole families which have been associated with Antony, in Cornwall, since the early fifteenth century.

One Response to “The world and his dog”

  1. columnist Says:

    Thanks for that. It’s a great resource.

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