Virtue and vice at Hardwick Hall

Detail of a painted wall hanging, depicting the conversion of Saul, c. 1600, in the Chapel at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Detail of a painted wall hanging, depicting the conversion of Saul, c. 1600, in the Chapel at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

An exhibition at Hardwick Hall explores the political, religious, and social upheaval of the Reformation. It shows how these new ideas and beliefs were reflected in the historic interiors and collections of the house.

The virtuous Penelope, in an appliqué wall hanging in the Hall at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/John Hammondbyshire

The virtuous Penelope, in an appliqué wall hanging in the Hall at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/John Hammondbyshire

The exhibition, called Virtue and Vice, has been curated by the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the University of York. It has also benefited from the Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project European Conversion Narratives, c.1550-1700.

The Eglantine table, inlaid with musical instruments, sheet music, games and arms, crests and mottoes, possibly c. 1567, in the High Great Chamber at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/Nick Guttridge

The Eglantine table, inlaid with musical instruments, sheet music, games and arms, crests and mottoes, possibly c. 1567, in the High Great Chamber at Hardwick Hall. ©National Trust Images/Nick Guttridge

In this video Dr Helen Smith, reader in Renaissance literature at the University of York, talks about the concept of the exhibition. And in this one a choral group performs the motet ‘Oh Lord in Thee is all my trust’ inlaid in the so-called Eglantine table in the High Great Chamber. At Hardwick, at least, Virtue seems to have found an ally in Beauty.

8 Responses to “Virtue and vice at Hardwick Hall”

  1. John in California Says:

    Loved the choral group video. Thanks.

  2. Princess of Eboli History Masquerade Says:

    Very interesting post!!!!!

  3. Susan Walter Says:

    Helen Smith’s article in ABC about her collaboration with the NT was extremely interesting and insightful.

  4. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    John, yes it is nice way to bring the past to life, isn’t it?

    Princess, thanks.

    Yes indeed, Susan, I will add a link as son as it becomes available online.

  5. deana Says:

    Mad for Hardwick Hall, I can’t wait to play the ap and relive my visit.
    The house was built to impress and it does it very well.

  6. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Thanks Deana – yes an amazing place with an amazing story.

  7. CherryPie Says:

    Hardwick Hall is a fascinating and interesting place. I enjoyed the flash mob (in your post) around the Elegant table which so captured my imagination earlier this year. I had not noticed the table on my previous visits.

    The Virtue and Vice exhibition looks interesting, how long does it run for?

  8. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Cherie, I think it has now finished, unfortunately!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 679 other followers

%d bloggers like this: