A Proustian moment at Mount Stewart

Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry, by Philip de Laszlo, 1914. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry, by Philip de Laszlo, 1914. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

As I came upon these portraits of Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry (1878-1949), and his wife Edith, née Chaplin (1879-1959), it struck me how redolent they are of the generation that bridged the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries.

Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, in the uniform of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, by Philip de Laszlo, 1918. ©Imperial War Museum, on loan to Mount Stewart

Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, in the uniform of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, by Philip de Laszlo, 1918. ©Imperial War Museum, on loan to Mount Stewart

The society portraitist Philip de Laszlo (1869-1937), who was very good at depicting people as they wished to be seen (and who was of the same generation), has imbued the Marquess and Marchioness with a Proustian mixture of aristocratic grandeur, earnest patriotism and modern self-awareness.

The 7th Marquess of Londonderry, with a portrait of Lord Castlereagh behind him, by Philip de Laszlo, 1924. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The 7th Marquess of Londonderry, with a portrait of Lord Castlereagh behind him, by Philip de Laszlo, 1924. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Lord Londonderry was descended from the one of the great politicians of the Napoleonic era, Lord Castlereagh, and he continued that tradition by participating in Irish and British politics. Lady Londonderry was one of the last great political hostesses, holding magnificent receptions at Londonderry House on Park Lane in London.

Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, by Philip de Laszlo, 1927. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry, by Philip de Laszlo, 1927. ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

The portraits hang at Mount Stewart, which was one of their secondary homes and where Lady Londonderry created a notable garden. The house is currently undergoing a restoration project which should eventually make this Proustian moment even more palpable to visitors.

7 Responses to “A Proustian moment at Mount Stewart”

  1. Susan Walter Says:

    Those de Laszlo portraits are certainly striking.

  2. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Yes and interesting that it was considered OK for some of them to have an unfinished look, at least around the edges.

  3. KDM Says:

    Beautiful – a glorious generation. KDM

  4. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    Glad you like it Keith!

  5. ann peacock Says:

    hi im looking for information on a lady in waiting to lady londonderry as she was my relative and im doing the family tree and have come accross some imformation that they were lady in waiting to i belive edith if you could supply any information this would be greatfully recived thankyou ann peacock

  6. Emile de Bruijn Says:

    I can certainly try to find out. What was the name of your relative?

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